'K. Karl Holmqvsit. JRP-Ringier.
A new artist’s book, “‘K” from Karl Holmqvist (born 1960 in Västerås, lives and works in Berlin and Stockholm), explores different levels of textual interaction with art. Both as concrete poems or language “drawings,” in which words and letters come to form patterns, and through repetitions somewhere between sense and non-sense, figuration and abstraction. His work may also take the form of longer spoken word poems intended for performance readings, again investigating the formats of repetition and variation, but with more of a rhythmic and musical structure tied to memory training techniques and oral tradition. Substantial parts of the book’s material are in fact gathered as “loans” from other artists, forming something of a mini-collection of language-art practices and references from Zurich and Berlin Dada, Futurism, Vorticism, Lettrisme, and onward to more contemporary formulations from artists such as Ferdinand Kriwet and Shannon Ebner.The book has been designed by the artist together with Joshua Schenkel (Müller & Wesse, Berlin). It is published as a joint collaboration on the occasions of the “solstice readings” at Kunsthalle Zürich and a newly commissioned installation at Bergen Kunsthall. 'K. Karl Holmqvsit. JRP-Ringier.
A new artist’s book, “‘K” from Karl Holmqvist (born 1960 in Västerås, lives and works in Berlin and Stockholm), explores different levels of textual interaction with art. Both as concrete poems or language “drawings,” in which words and letters come to form patterns, and through repetitions somewhere between sense and non-sense, figuration and abstraction. His work may also take the form of longer spoken word poems intended for performance readings, again investigating the formats of repetition and variation, but with more of a rhythmic and musical structure tied to memory training techniques and oral tradition. Substantial parts of the book’s material are in fact gathered as “loans” from other artists, forming something of a mini-collection of language-art practices and references from Zurich and Berlin Dada, Futurism, Vorticism, Lettrisme, and onward to more contemporary formulations from artists such as Ferdinand Kriwet and Shannon Ebner.The book has been designed by the artist together with Joshua Schenkel (Müller & Wesse, Berlin). It is published as a joint collaboration on the occasions of the “solstice readings” at Kunsthalle Zürich and a newly commissioned installation at Bergen Kunsthall. 'K. Karl Holmqvsit. JRP-Ringier.
A new artist’s book, “‘K” from Karl Holmqvist (born 1960 in Västerås, lives and works in Berlin and Stockholm), explores different levels of textual interaction with art. Both as concrete poems or language “drawings,” in which words and letters come to form patterns, and through repetitions somewhere between sense and non-sense, figuration and abstraction. His work may also take the form of longer spoken word poems intended for performance readings, again investigating the formats of repetition and variation, but with more of a rhythmic and musical structure tied to memory training techniques and oral tradition. Substantial parts of the book’s material are in fact gathered as “loans” from other artists, forming something of a mini-collection of language-art practices and references from Zurich and Berlin Dada, Futurism, Vorticism, Lettrisme, and onward to more contemporary formulations from artists such as Ferdinand Kriwet and Shannon Ebner.The book has been designed by the artist together with Joshua Schenkel (Müller & Wesse, Berlin). It is published as a joint collaboration on the occasions of the “solstice readings” at Kunsthalle Zürich and a newly commissioned installation at Bergen Kunsthall. 'K. Karl Holmqvsit. JRP-Ringier.
A new artist’s book, “‘K” from Karl Holmqvist (born 1960 in Västerås, lives and works in Berlin and Stockholm), explores different levels of textual interaction with art. Both as concrete poems or language “drawings,” in which words and letters come to form patterns, and through repetitions somewhere between sense and non-sense, figuration and abstraction. His work may also take the form of longer spoken word poems intended for performance readings, again investigating the formats of repetition and variation, but with more of a rhythmic and musical structure tied to memory training techniques and oral tradition. Substantial parts of the book’s material are in fact gathered as “loans” from other artists, forming something of a mini-collection of language-art practices and references from Zurich and Berlin Dada, Futurism, Vorticism, Lettrisme, and onward to more contemporary formulations from artists such as Ferdinand Kriwet and Shannon Ebner.The book has been designed by the artist together with Joshua Schenkel (Müller & Wesse, Berlin). It is published as a joint collaboration on the occasions of the “solstice readings” at Kunsthalle Zürich and a newly commissioned installation at Bergen Kunsthall. 'K. Karl Holmqvsit. JRP-Ringier.
A new artist’s book, “‘K” from Karl Holmqvist (born 1960 in Västerås, lives and works in Berlin and Stockholm), explores different levels of textual interaction with art. Both as concrete poems or language “drawings,” in which words and letters come to form patterns, and through repetitions somewhere between sense and non-sense, figuration and abstraction. His work may also take the form of longer spoken word poems intended for performance readings, again investigating the formats of repetition and variation, but with more of a rhythmic and musical structure tied to memory training techniques and oral tradition. Substantial parts of the book’s material are in fact gathered as “loans” from other artists, forming something of a mini-collection of language-art practices and references from Zurich and Berlin Dada, Futurism, Vorticism, Lettrisme, and onward to more contemporary formulations from artists such as Ferdinand Kriwet and Shannon Ebner.The book has been designed by the artist together with Joshua Schenkel (Müller & Wesse, Berlin). It is published as a joint collaboration on the occasions of the “solstice readings” at Kunsthalle Zürich and a newly commissioned installation at Bergen Kunsthall. 'K. Karl Holmqvsit. JRP-Ringier.
A new artist’s book, “‘K” from Karl Holmqvist (born 1960 in Västerås, lives and works in Berlin and Stockholm), explores different levels of textual interaction with art. Both as concrete poems or language “drawings,” in which words and letters come to form patterns, and through repetitions somewhere between sense and non-sense, figuration and abstraction. His work may also take the form of longer spoken word poems intended for performance readings, again investigating the formats of repetition and variation, but with more of a rhythmic and musical structure tied to memory training techniques and oral tradition. Substantial parts of the book’s material are in fact gathered as “loans” from other artists, forming something of a mini-collection of language-art practices and references from Zurich and Berlin Dada, Futurism, Vorticism, Lettrisme, and onward to more contemporary formulations from artists such as Ferdinand Kriwet and Shannon Ebner.The book has been designed by the artist together with Joshua Schenkel (Müller & Wesse, Berlin). It is published as a joint collaboration on the occasions of the “solstice readings” at Kunsthalle Zürich and a newly commissioned installation at Bergen Kunsthall. 'K. Karl Holmqvsit. JRP-Ringier.
A new artist’s book, “‘K” from Karl Holmqvist (born 1960 in Västerås, lives and works in Berlin and Stockholm), explores different levels of textual interaction with art. Both as concrete poems or language “drawings,” in which words and letters come to form patterns, and through repetitions somewhere between sense and non-sense, figuration and abstraction. His work may also take the form of longer spoken word poems intended for performance readings, again investigating the formats of repetition and variation, but with more of a rhythmic and musical structure tied to memory training techniques and oral tradition. Substantial parts of the book’s material are in fact gathered as “loans” from other artists, forming something of a mini-collection of language-art practices and references from Zurich and Berlin Dada, Futurism, Vorticism, Lettrisme, and onward to more contemporary formulations from artists such as Ferdinand Kriwet and Shannon Ebner.The book has been designed by the artist together with Joshua Schenkel (Müller & Wesse, Berlin). It is published as a joint collaboration on the occasions of the “solstice readings” at Kunsthalle Zürich and a newly commissioned installation at Bergen Kunsthall.

'K. Karl Holmqvsit. JRP-Ringier.

A new artist’s book, “‘K” from Karl Holmqvist (born 1960 in Västerås, lives and works in Berlin and Stockholm), explores different levels of textual interaction with art. Both as concrete poems or language “drawings,” in which words and letters come to form patterns, and through repetitions somewhere between sense and non-sense, figuration and abstraction. His work may also take the form of longer spoken word poems intended for performance readings, again investigating the formats of repetition and variation, but with more of a rhythmic and musical structure tied to memory training techniques and oral tradition. Substantial parts of the book’s material are in fact gathered as “loans” from other artists, forming something of a mini-collection of language-art practices and references from Zurich and Berlin Dada, Futurism, Vorticism, Lettrisme, and onward to more contemporary formulations from artists such as Ferdinand Kriwet and Shannon Ebner.

The book has been designed by the artist together with Joshua Schenkel (Müller & Wesse, Berlin). It is published as a joint collaboration on the occasions of the “solstice readings” at Kunsthalle Zürich and a newly commissioned installation at Bergen Kunsthall.

Orte - Schweizer Literaturzeitschrift #178. “Ich weiss und grün”: Von Lautmalern und Bildpoeten. Orte - Schweizer Literaturzeitschrift #178. “Ich weiss und grün”: Von Lautmalern und Bildpoeten. Orte - Schweizer Literaturzeitschrift #178. “Ich weiss und grün”: Von Lautmalern und Bildpoeten. Orte - Schweizer Literaturzeitschrift #178. “Ich weiss und grün”: Von Lautmalern und Bildpoeten. Orte - Schweizer Literaturzeitschrift #178. “Ich weiss und grün”: Von Lautmalern und Bildpoeten. Orte - Schweizer Literaturzeitschrift #178. “Ich weiss und grün”: Von Lautmalern und Bildpoeten. Orte - Schweizer Literaturzeitschrift #178. “Ich weiss und grün”: Von Lautmalern und Bildpoeten. Orte - Schweizer Literaturzeitschrift #178. “Ich weiss und grün”: Von Lautmalern und Bildpoeten.

Orte - Schweizer Literaturzeitschrift #178. “Ich weiss und grün”: Von Lautmalern und Bildpoeten.

Quant aux livres / On Books. Ulises Carrion. Éditions Héros-Limite.
Edition bilingue, textes rassemblés par Juan J. Agius, introduction d’Anne Mœglin-Delcroix & de Clive Phillpot. Traduction: Thierry Dubois / 216 pages / 150 x 210 mm / 1997/2008 / ISBN 978-2-970030-01-0  Quant aux livres / On Books. Ulises Carrion. Éditions Héros-Limite.
Edition bilingue, textes rassemblés par Juan J. Agius, introduction d’Anne Mœglin-Delcroix & de Clive Phillpot. Traduction: Thierry Dubois / 216 pages / 150 x 210 mm / 1997/2008 / ISBN 978-2-970030-01-0  Quant aux livres / On Books. Ulises Carrion. Éditions Héros-Limite.
Edition bilingue, textes rassemblés par Juan J. Agius, introduction d’Anne Mœglin-Delcroix & de Clive Phillpot. Traduction: Thierry Dubois / 216 pages / 150 x 210 mm / 1997/2008 / ISBN 978-2-970030-01-0  Quant aux livres / On Books. Ulises Carrion. Éditions Héros-Limite.
Edition bilingue, textes rassemblés par Juan J. Agius, introduction d’Anne Mœglin-Delcroix & de Clive Phillpot. Traduction: Thierry Dubois / 216 pages / 150 x 210 mm / 1997/2008 / ISBN 978-2-970030-01-0  Quant aux livres / On Books. Ulises Carrion. Éditions Héros-Limite.
Edition bilingue, textes rassemblés par Juan J. Agius, introduction d’Anne Mœglin-Delcroix & de Clive Phillpot. Traduction: Thierry Dubois / 216 pages / 150 x 210 mm / 1997/2008 / ISBN 978-2-970030-01-0  Quant aux livres / On Books. Ulises Carrion. Éditions Héros-Limite.
Edition bilingue, textes rassemblés par Juan J. Agius, introduction d’Anne Mœglin-Delcroix & de Clive Phillpot. Traduction: Thierry Dubois / 216 pages / 150 x 210 mm / 1997/2008 / ISBN 978-2-970030-01-0 

Quant aux livres / On Books. Ulises Carrion. Éditions Héros-Limite.

Edition bilingue, textes rassemblés par Juan J. Agius, introduction d’Anne Mœglin-Delcroix & de Clive Phillpot. Traduction: Thierry Dubois / 216 pages / 150 x 210 mm / 1997/2008 / ISBN 978-2-970030-01-0 

Apollo Amerika. Ferdinand Kriwet. edition suhrkamp (1969).  Apollo Amerika. Ferdinand Kriwet. edition suhrkamp (1969).  Apollo Amerika. Ferdinand Kriwet. edition suhrkamp (1969).  Apollo Amerika. Ferdinand Kriwet. edition suhrkamp (1969).  Apollo Amerika. Ferdinand Kriwet. edition suhrkamp (1969).  Apollo Amerika. Ferdinand Kriwet. edition suhrkamp (1969).  Apollo Amerika. Ferdinand Kriwet. edition suhrkamp (1969).  Apollo Amerika. Ferdinand Kriwet. edition suhrkamp (1969).  Apollo Amerika. Ferdinand Kriwet. edition suhrkamp (1969). 

Apollo Amerika. Ferdinand Kriwet. edition suhrkamp (1969). 

Natalie Czech, “I cannot repeat what I hear,” Galerie Capitain Petzel. November 23, 2013 - January 25, 2014. Natalie Czech, “I cannot repeat what I hear,” Galerie Capitain Petzel. November 23, 2013 - January 25, 2014. Natalie Czech, “I cannot repeat what I hear,” Galerie Capitain Petzel. November 23, 2013 - January 25, 2014. Natalie Czech, “I cannot repeat what I hear,” Galerie Capitain Petzel. November 23, 2013 - January 25, 2014. Natalie Czech, “I cannot repeat what I hear,” Galerie Capitain Petzel. November 23, 2013 - January 25, 2014. Natalie Czech, “I cannot repeat what I hear,” Galerie Capitain Petzel. November 23, 2013 - January 25, 2014. Natalie Czech, “I cannot repeat what I hear,” Galerie Capitain Petzel. November 23, 2013 - January 25, 2014. Natalie Czech, “I cannot repeat what I hear,” Galerie Capitain Petzel. November 23, 2013 - January 25, 2014.

Natalie Czech, “I cannot repeat what I hear,” Galerie Capitain Petzel. November 23, 2013 - January 25, 2014.

Psycho Building, Zurich. 

1-4: Catalogue of the 2014 Text Festival exhibitions at the Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre, England.
5-8: Photos of works in Volume 3 of “The Dark Would” exhibition, curated by Philip Davenport. Shown are a series of list poems; works by Erica Baum; Marton Koppany (“The Other Side”); and Derek Beaulieu (“Helvetica”). 1-4: Catalogue of the 2014 Text Festival exhibitions at the Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre, England.
5-8: Photos of works in Volume 3 of “The Dark Would” exhibition, curated by Philip Davenport. Shown are a series of list poems; works by Erica Baum; Marton Koppany (“The Other Side”); and Derek Beaulieu (“Helvetica”). 1-4: Catalogue of the 2014 Text Festival exhibitions at the Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre, England.
5-8: Photos of works in Volume 3 of “The Dark Would” exhibition, curated by Philip Davenport. Shown are a series of list poems; works by Erica Baum; Marton Koppany (“The Other Side”); and Derek Beaulieu (“Helvetica”). 1-4: Catalogue of the 2014 Text Festival exhibitions at the Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre, England.
5-8: Photos of works in Volume 3 of “The Dark Would” exhibition, curated by Philip Davenport. Shown are a series of list poems; works by Erica Baum; Marton Koppany (“The Other Side”); and Derek Beaulieu (“Helvetica”). 1-4: Catalogue of the 2014 Text Festival exhibitions at the Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre, England.
5-8: Photos of works in Volume 3 of “The Dark Would” exhibition, curated by Philip Davenport. Shown are a series of list poems; works by Erica Baum; Marton Koppany (“The Other Side”); and Derek Beaulieu (“Helvetica”). 1-4: Catalogue of the 2014 Text Festival exhibitions at the Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre, England.
5-8: Photos of works in Volume 3 of “The Dark Would” exhibition, curated by Philip Davenport. Shown are a series of list poems; works by Erica Baum; Marton Koppany (“The Other Side”); and Derek Beaulieu (“Helvetica”). 1-4: Catalogue of the 2014 Text Festival exhibitions at the Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre, England.
5-8: Photos of works in Volume 3 of “The Dark Would” exhibition, curated by Philip Davenport. Shown are a series of list poems; works by Erica Baum; Marton Koppany (“The Other Side”); and Derek Beaulieu (“Helvetica”). 1-4: Catalogue of the 2014 Text Festival exhibitions at the Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre, England.
5-8: Photos of works in Volume 3 of “The Dark Would” exhibition, curated by Philip Davenport. Shown are a series of list poems; works by Erica Baum; Marton Koppany (“The Other Side”); and Derek Beaulieu (“Helvetica”).

1-4: Catalogue of the 2014 Text Festival exhibitions at the Bury Art Museum & Sculpture Centre, England.

5-8: Photos of works in Volume 3 of “The Dark Would” exhibition, curated by Philip Davenport. Shown are a series of list poems; works by Erica Baum; Marton Koppany (“The Other Side”); and Derek Beaulieu (“Helvetica”).

Spra:ch Art. Berliner Gesellschaft für Neue Musik. Festival für Sprache und Musik. 24-27 September 1992.  Spra:ch Art. Berliner Gesellschaft für Neue Musik. Festival für Sprache und Musik. 24-27 September 1992.  Spra:ch Art. Berliner Gesellschaft für Neue Musik. Festival für Sprache und Musik. 24-27 September 1992.  Spra:ch Art. Berliner Gesellschaft für Neue Musik. Festival für Sprache und Musik. 24-27 September 1992.  Spra:ch Art. Berliner Gesellschaft für Neue Musik. Festival für Sprache und Musik. 24-27 September 1992.  Spra:ch Art. Berliner Gesellschaft für Neue Musik. Festival für Sprache und Musik. 24-27 September 1992. 

Spra:ch Art. Berliner Gesellschaft für Neue Musik. Festival für Sprache und Musik. 24-27 September 1992. 

Reading Tests. Jack Henrie Fisher, Popahna Brandes. Jan van Eyck Academie (2012). 
A note about the words in the book – where they come from and what has happened to them. Many of them, the ones on the right-side and the ones at the end, are “suspicious” words from Google Books, words from book scans which can’t be machine-read. Google offers these unreadable words as reversed Turing Tests to human readers in their project to digitize all the books in their digital library. These images of words have been gathered for this book in thousands of refreshes at the threshold to a PDF download. A human writer, in turn, has read the words for some rhythm of sense. In these tests she has rearranged them accordingly.The texts to the left are, in the first section, edited from a medium-sized dictionary used for dictionary attack, the machine procedure whereby every word of a dictionary is fired at an empty internet password field. The second section alternates verso and recto pages from Freud’s “Mistakes in Reading and Slips of the Pen”. These pages have been submitted and resubmitted to an optical character recognition which rotates, stretches, and darkens pixels in order to bring the image closer to what might be recognized as a letter. When a recognition takes place, the image becomes a text and can be highlighted, underlined, crossed out, edited – formal actions which turn out to hinder a reading conversion the next time around. This recursivity may proceed to the point of invention – that is, a new letter is found or drawn by the reading software. Raymond Williams’ essay “Means of Communication as Means of Production” is captured in the third section, erringly, as text, with all the mistakes this process must make from a low-resolution scan. A typographer has underlined some pertinent points within it. At the end of the book, the suspicious, unreadable words are given over and over again to optical character recognition, alongside an interfering element – usually a curved line, the current standard for hindering spam-intending machine readers. These images, as well as whatever reading marks can follow from a recognition, are cut and straightened and moved around in each subsequent reading, on their way to becoming texts, but never completely assuming sense.
208 pp, 140 x 197 mm, edition 250 Reading Tests. Jack Henrie Fisher, Popahna Brandes. Jan van Eyck Academie (2012). 
A note about the words in the book – where they come from and what has happened to them. Many of them, the ones on the right-side and the ones at the end, are “suspicious” words from Google Books, words from book scans which can’t be machine-read. Google offers these unreadable words as reversed Turing Tests to human readers in their project to digitize all the books in their digital library. These images of words have been gathered for this book in thousands of refreshes at the threshold to a PDF download. A human writer, in turn, has read the words for some rhythm of sense. In these tests she has rearranged them accordingly.The texts to the left are, in the first section, edited from a medium-sized dictionary used for dictionary attack, the machine procedure whereby every word of a dictionary is fired at an empty internet password field. The second section alternates verso and recto pages from Freud’s “Mistakes in Reading and Slips of the Pen”. These pages have been submitted and resubmitted to an optical character recognition which rotates, stretches, and darkens pixels in order to bring the image closer to what might be recognized as a letter. When a recognition takes place, the image becomes a text and can be highlighted, underlined, crossed out, edited – formal actions which turn out to hinder a reading conversion the next time around. This recursivity may proceed to the point of invention – that is, a new letter is found or drawn by the reading software. Raymond Williams’ essay “Means of Communication as Means of Production” is captured in the third section, erringly, as text, with all the mistakes this process must make from a low-resolution scan. A typographer has underlined some pertinent points within it. At the end of the book, the suspicious, unreadable words are given over and over again to optical character recognition, alongside an interfering element – usually a curved line, the current standard for hindering spam-intending machine readers. These images, as well as whatever reading marks can follow from a recognition, are cut and straightened and moved around in each subsequent reading, on their way to becoming texts, but never completely assuming sense.
208 pp, 140 x 197 mm, edition 250 Reading Tests. Jack Henrie Fisher, Popahna Brandes. Jan van Eyck Academie (2012). 
A note about the words in the book – where they come from and what has happened to them. Many of them, the ones on the right-side and the ones at the end, are “suspicious” words from Google Books, words from book scans which can’t be machine-read. Google offers these unreadable words as reversed Turing Tests to human readers in their project to digitize all the books in their digital library. These images of words have been gathered for this book in thousands of refreshes at the threshold to a PDF download. A human writer, in turn, has read the words for some rhythm of sense. In these tests she has rearranged them accordingly.The texts to the left are, in the first section, edited from a medium-sized dictionary used for dictionary attack, the machine procedure whereby every word of a dictionary is fired at an empty internet password field. The second section alternates verso and recto pages from Freud’s “Mistakes in Reading and Slips of the Pen”. These pages have been submitted and resubmitted to an optical character recognition which rotates, stretches, and darkens pixels in order to bring the image closer to what might be recognized as a letter. When a recognition takes place, the image becomes a text and can be highlighted, underlined, crossed out, edited – formal actions which turn out to hinder a reading conversion the next time around. This recursivity may proceed to the point of invention – that is, a new letter is found or drawn by the reading software. Raymond Williams’ essay “Means of Communication as Means of Production” is captured in the third section, erringly, as text, with all the mistakes this process must make from a low-resolution scan. A typographer has underlined some pertinent points within it. At the end of the book, the suspicious, unreadable words are given over and over again to optical character recognition, alongside an interfering element – usually a curved line, the current standard for hindering spam-intending machine readers. These images, as well as whatever reading marks can follow from a recognition, are cut and straightened and moved around in each subsequent reading, on their way to becoming texts, but never completely assuming sense.
208 pp, 140 x 197 mm, edition 250 Reading Tests. Jack Henrie Fisher, Popahna Brandes. Jan van Eyck Academie (2012). 
A note about the words in the book – where they come from and what has happened to them. Many of them, the ones on the right-side and the ones at the end, are “suspicious” words from Google Books, words from book scans which can’t be machine-read. Google offers these unreadable words as reversed Turing Tests to human readers in their project to digitize all the books in their digital library. These images of words have been gathered for this book in thousands of refreshes at the threshold to a PDF download. A human writer, in turn, has read the words for some rhythm of sense. In these tests she has rearranged them accordingly.The texts to the left are, in the first section, edited from a medium-sized dictionary used for dictionary attack, the machine procedure whereby every word of a dictionary is fired at an empty internet password field. The second section alternates verso and recto pages from Freud’s “Mistakes in Reading and Slips of the Pen”. These pages have been submitted and resubmitted to an optical character recognition which rotates, stretches, and darkens pixels in order to bring the image closer to what might be recognized as a letter. When a recognition takes place, the image becomes a text and can be highlighted, underlined, crossed out, edited – formal actions which turn out to hinder a reading conversion the next time around. This recursivity may proceed to the point of invention – that is, a new letter is found or drawn by the reading software. Raymond Williams’ essay “Means of Communication as Means of Production” is captured in the third section, erringly, as text, with all the mistakes this process must make from a low-resolution scan. A typographer has underlined some pertinent points within it. At the end of the book, the suspicious, unreadable words are given over and over again to optical character recognition, alongside an interfering element – usually a curved line, the current standard for hindering spam-intending machine readers. These images, as well as whatever reading marks can follow from a recognition, are cut and straightened and moved around in each subsequent reading, on their way to becoming texts, but never completely assuming sense.
208 pp, 140 x 197 mm, edition 250 Reading Tests. Jack Henrie Fisher, Popahna Brandes. Jan van Eyck Academie (2012). 
A note about the words in the book – where they come from and what has happened to them. Many of them, the ones on the right-side and the ones at the end, are “suspicious” words from Google Books, words from book scans which can’t be machine-read. Google offers these unreadable words as reversed Turing Tests to human readers in their project to digitize all the books in their digital library. These images of words have been gathered for this book in thousands of refreshes at the threshold to a PDF download. A human writer, in turn, has read the words for some rhythm of sense. In these tests she has rearranged them accordingly.The texts to the left are, in the first section, edited from a medium-sized dictionary used for dictionary attack, the machine procedure whereby every word of a dictionary is fired at an empty internet password field. The second section alternates verso and recto pages from Freud’s “Mistakes in Reading and Slips of the Pen”. These pages have been submitted and resubmitted to an optical character recognition which rotates, stretches, and darkens pixels in order to bring the image closer to what might be recognized as a letter. When a recognition takes place, the image becomes a text and can be highlighted, underlined, crossed out, edited – formal actions which turn out to hinder a reading conversion the next time around. This recursivity may proceed to the point of invention – that is, a new letter is found or drawn by the reading software. Raymond Williams’ essay “Means of Communication as Means of Production” is captured in the third section, erringly, as text, with all the mistakes this process must make from a low-resolution scan. A typographer has underlined some pertinent points within it. At the end of the book, the suspicious, unreadable words are given over and over again to optical character recognition, alongside an interfering element – usually a curved line, the current standard for hindering spam-intending machine readers. These images, as well as whatever reading marks can follow from a recognition, are cut and straightened and moved around in each subsequent reading, on their way to becoming texts, but never completely assuming sense.
208 pp, 140 x 197 mm, edition 250 Reading Tests. Jack Henrie Fisher, Popahna Brandes. Jan van Eyck Academie (2012). 
A note about the words in the book – where they come from and what has happened to them. Many of them, the ones on the right-side and the ones at the end, are “suspicious” words from Google Books, words from book scans which can’t be machine-read. Google offers these unreadable words as reversed Turing Tests to human readers in their project to digitize all the books in their digital library. These images of words have been gathered for this book in thousands of refreshes at the threshold to a PDF download. A human writer, in turn, has read the words for some rhythm of sense. In these tests she has rearranged them accordingly.The texts to the left are, in the first section, edited from a medium-sized dictionary used for dictionary attack, the machine procedure whereby every word of a dictionary is fired at an empty internet password field. The second section alternates verso and recto pages from Freud’s “Mistakes in Reading and Slips of the Pen”. These pages have been submitted and resubmitted to an optical character recognition which rotates, stretches, and darkens pixels in order to bring the image closer to what might be recognized as a letter. When a recognition takes place, the image becomes a text and can be highlighted, underlined, crossed out, edited – formal actions which turn out to hinder a reading conversion the next time around. This recursivity may proceed to the point of invention – that is, a new letter is found or drawn by the reading software. Raymond Williams’ essay “Means of Communication as Means of Production” is captured in the third section, erringly, as text, with all the mistakes this process must make from a low-resolution scan. A typographer has underlined some pertinent points within it. At the end of the book, the suspicious, unreadable words are given over and over again to optical character recognition, alongside an interfering element – usually a curved line, the current standard for hindering spam-intending machine readers. These images, as well as whatever reading marks can follow from a recognition, are cut and straightened and moved around in each subsequent reading, on their way to becoming texts, but never completely assuming sense.
208 pp, 140 x 197 mm, edition 250 Reading Tests. Jack Henrie Fisher, Popahna Brandes. Jan van Eyck Academie (2012). 
A note about the words in the book – where they come from and what has happened to them. Many of them, the ones on the right-side and the ones at the end, are “suspicious” words from Google Books, words from book scans which can’t be machine-read. Google offers these unreadable words as reversed Turing Tests to human readers in their project to digitize all the books in their digital library. These images of words have been gathered for this book in thousands of refreshes at the threshold to a PDF download. A human writer, in turn, has read the words for some rhythm of sense. In these tests she has rearranged them accordingly.The texts to the left are, in the first section, edited from a medium-sized dictionary used for dictionary attack, the machine procedure whereby every word of a dictionary is fired at an empty internet password field. The second section alternates verso and recto pages from Freud’s “Mistakes in Reading and Slips of the Pen”. These pages have been submitted and resubmitted to an optical character recognition which rotates, stretches, and darkens pixels in order to bring the image closer to what might be recognized as a letter. When a recognition takes place, the image becomes a text and can be highlighted, underlined, crossed out, edited – formal actions which turn out to hinder a reading conversion the next time around. This recursivity may proceed to the point of invention – that is, a new letter is found or drawn by the reading software. Raymond Williams’ essay “Means of Communication as Means of Production” is captured in the third section, erringly, as text, with all the mistakes this process must make from a low-resolution scan. A typographer has underlined some pertinent points within it. At the end of the book, the suspicious, unreadable words are given over and over again to optical character recognition, alongside an interfering element – usually a curved line, the current standard for hindering spam-intending machine readers. These images, as well as whatever reading marks can follow from a recognition, are cut and straightened and moved around in each subsequent reading, on their way to becoming texts, but never completely assuming sense.
208 pp, 140 x 197 mm, edition 250 Reading Tests. Jack Henrie Fisher, Popahna Brandes. Jan van Eyck Academie (2012). 
A note about the words in the book – where they come from and what has happened to them. Many of them, the ones on the right-side and the ones at the end, are “suspicious” words from Google Books, words from book scans which can’t be machine-read. Google offers these unreadable words as reversed Turing Tests to human readers in their project to digitize all the books in their digital library. These images of words have been gathered for this book in thousands of refreshes at the threshold to a PDF download. A human writer, in turn, has read the words for some rhythm of sense. In these tests she has rearranged them accordingly.The texts to the left are, in the first section, edited from a medium-sized dictionary used for dictionary attack, the machine procedure whereby every word of a dictionary is fired at an empty internet password field. The second section alternates verso and recto pages from Freud’s “Mistakes in Reading and Slips of the Pen”. These pages have been submitted and resubmitted to an optical character recognition which rotates, stretches, and darkens pixels in order to bring the image closer to what might be recognized as a letter. When a recognition takes place, the image becomes a text and can be highlighted, underlined, crossed out, edited – formal actions which turn out to hinder a reading conversion the next time around. This recursivity may proceed to the point of invention – that is, a new letter is found or drawn by the reading software. Raymond Williams’ essay “Means of Communication as Means of Production” is captured in the third section, erringly, as text, with all the mistakes this process must make from a low-resolution scan. A typographer has underlined some pertinent points within it. At the end of the book, the suspicious, unreadable words are given over and over again to optical character recognition, alongside an interfering element – usually a curved line, the current standard for hindering spam-intending machine readers. These images, as well as whatever reading marks can follow from a recognition, are cut and straightened and moved around in each subsequent reading, on their way to becoming texts, but never completely assuming sense.
208 pp, 140 x 197 mm, edition 250 Reading Tests. Jack Henrie Fisher, Popahna Brandes. Jan van Eyck Academie (2012). 
A note about the words in the book – where they come from and what has happened to them. Many of them, the ones on the right-side and the ones at the end, are “suspicious” words from Google Books, words from book scans which can’t be machine-read. Google offers these unreadable words as reversed Turing Tests to human readers in their project to digitize all the books in their digital library. These images of words have been gathered for this book in thousands of refreshes at the threshold to a PDF download. A human writer, in turn, has read the words for some rhythm of sense. In these tests she has rearranged them accordingly.The texts to the left are, in the first section, edited from a medium-sized dictionary used for dictionary attack, the machine procedure whereby every word of a dictionary is fired at an empty internet password field. The second section alternates verso and recto pages from Freud’s “Mistakes in Reading and Slips of the Pen”. These pages have been submitted and resubmitted to an optical character recognition which rotates, stretches, and darkens pixels in order to bring the image closer to what might be recognized as a letter. When a recognition takes place, the image becomes a text and can be highlighted, underlined, crossed out, edited – formal actions which turn out to hinder a reading conversion the next time around. This recursivity may proceed to the point of invention – that is, a new letter is found or drawn by the reading software. Raymond Williams’ essay “Means of Communication as Means of Production” is captured in the third section, erringly, as text, with all the mistakes this process must make from a low-resolution scan. A typographer has underlined some pertinent points within it. At the end of the book, the suspicious, unreadable words are given over and over again to optical character recognition, alongside an interfering element – usually a curved line, the current standard for hindering spam-intending machine readers. These images, as well as whatever reading marks can follow from a recognition, are cut and straightened and moved around in each subsequent reading, on their way to becoming texts, but never completely assuming sense.
208 pp, 140 x 197 mm, edition 250

Reading Tests. Jack Henrie Fisher, Popahna Brandes. Jan van Eyck Academie (2012). 

A note about the words in the book – where they come from and what has happened to them. 

Many of them, the ones on the right-side and the ones at the end, are “suspicious” words from Google Books, words from book scans which can’t be machine-read. Google offers these unreadable words as reversed Turing Tests to human readers in their project to digitize all the books in their digital library. These images of words have been gathered for this book in thousands of refreshes at the threshold to a PDF download. A human writer, in turn, has read the words for some rhythm of sense. In these tests she has rearranged them accordingly.The texts to the left are, in the first section, edited from a medium-sized dictionary used for dictionary attack, the machine procedure whereby every word of a dictionary is fired at an empty internet password field. 

The second section alternates verso and recto pages from Freud’s “Mistakes in Reading and Slips of the Pen”. These pages have been submitted and resubmitted to an optical character recognition which rotates, stretches, and darkens pixels in order to bring the image closer to what might be recognized as a letter. When a recognition takes place, the image becomes a text and can be highlighted, underlined, crossed out, edited – formal actions which turn out to hinder a reading conversion the next time around. This recursivity may proceed to the point of invention – that is, a new letter is found or drawn by the reading software. 

Raymond Williams’ essay “Means of Communication as Means of Production” is captured in the third section, erringly, as text, with all the mistakes this process must make from a low-resolution scan. A typographer has underlined some pertinent points within it. 

At the end of the book, the suspicious, unreadable words are given over and over again to optical character recognition, alongside an interfering element – usually a curved line, the current standard for hindering spam-intending machine readers. These images, as well as whatever reading marks can follow from a recognition, are cut and straightened and moved around in each subsequent reading, on their way to becoming texts, but never completely assuming sense.


208 pp, 140 x 197 mm, edition 250

Malicious Damage: The Defaced Library Books of Kenneth Halliwell and Joe Orton. Ilsa Colsell. Donlon Books (2013).
In 1962, a then unknown couple, John (Joe) Orton and Kenneth Halliwell, were tried at Old Street Magistrates Court, London, charged with, ‘larceny, malicious damage and wilful damage’, involving hundreds of Islington Library’s book stock. Over the previous three years the pair had been secretly stealing these books, removing what amounted to thousands of valuable art plates and either using them to create alternative dust jackets for other books, (which were then returned quietly to the library’s shelves for unsuspecting browsers to find), or pasting them directly into a large and uninterrupted collage spanning the interior walls of their one-roomed flat on nearby Noel Road. The pair would receive a six-month custodial sentence for these actions. The reconfigured dust jackets were part of a decade of often shared creative endeavour; the two had written, collaged and entertained themselves with the combined fragments of Arts history and contemporary culture. This small flat their studio and living space, and where they enacted a loving relationship at a time when homosexuality was forbidden by law ‘in public and in private’. Their arrest and trial would be an abrupt curtailment of this private idyll and a turning point in their lives, setting them separately (though never entirely separated) on a path which would lead John to become Joe Orton, one of the fashionable playwrights of sixties London. Halliwell pursued his own creative path with further collage — but did so without fully finding an audience for his artwork to match Orton’s rapid theatrical success. Their deaths at Noel Road five years later in 1967 became the sensationalised end to what had largely been a private, enclosed life together; Orton murdered by Halliwell who then took his own life. Now, fifty years after the trial, Malicious Damage looks closely at the collaged dust jackets still remaining within the archive at Islington Local History Centre and focuses on the early collaborative nature of Orton and Halliwell’s relationship. Using the changing collage that had consumed such a large part of their lives in Noel Road as its frame, Malicious Damage underlines the visual and performative nature of their collaborations, as well as using the process of collage itself to investigate Halliwell and his work in greater detail. Malicious Damage: The Defaced Library Books of Kenneth Halliwell and Joe Orton. Ilsa Colsell. Donlon Books (2013).
In 1962, a then unknown couple, John (Joe) Orton and Kenneth Halliwell, were tried at Old Street Magistrates Court, London, charged with, ‘larceny, malicious damage and wilful damage’, involving hundreds of Islington Library’s book stock. Over the previous three years the pair had been secretly stealing these books, removing what amounted to thousands of valuable art plates and either using them to create alternative dust jackets for other books, (which were then returned quietly to the library’s shelves for unsuspecting browsers to find), or pasting them directly into a large and uninterrupted collage spanning the interior walls of their one-roomed flat on nearby Noel Road. The pair would receive a six-month custodial sentence for these actions. The reconfigured dust jackets were part of a decade of often shared creative endeavour; the two had written, collaged and entertained themselves with the combined fragments of Arts history and contemporary culture. This small flat their studio and living space, and where they enacted a loving relationship at a time when homosexuality was forbidden by law ‘in public and in private’. Their arrest and trial would be an abrupt curtailment of this private idyll and a turning point in their lives, setting them separately (though never entirely separated) on a path which would lead John to become Joe Orton, one of the fashionable playwrights of sixties London. Halliwell pursued his own creative path with further collage — but did so without fully finding an audience for his artwork to match Orton’s rapid theatrical success. Their deaths at Noel Road five years later in 1967 became the sensationalised end to what had largely been a private, enclosed life together; Orton murdered by Halliwell who then took his own life. Now, fifty years after the trial, Malicious Damage looks closely at the collaged dust jackets still remaining within the archive at Islington Local History Centre and focuses on the early collaborative nature of Orton and Halliwell’s relationship. Using the changing collage that had consumed such a large part of their lives in Noel Road as its frame, Malicious Damage underlines the visual and performative nature of their collaborations, as well as using the process of collage itself to investigate Halliwell and his work in greater detail. Malicious Damage: The Defaced Library Books of Kenneth Halliwell and Joe Orton. Ilsa Colsell. Donlon Books (2013).
In 1962, a then unknown couple, John (Joe) Orton and Kenneth Halliwell, were tried at Old Street Magistrates Court, London, charged with, ‘larceny, malicious damage and wilful damage’, involving hundreds of Islington Library’s book stock. Over the previous three years the pair had been secretly stealing these books, removing what amounted to thousands of valuable art plates and either using them to create alternative dust jackets for other books, (which were then returned quietly to the library’s shelves for unsuspecting browsers to find), or pasting them directly into a large and uninterrupted collage spanning the interior walls of their one-roomed flat on nearby Noel Road. The pair would receive a six-month custodial sentence for these actions. The reconfigured dust jackets were part of a decade of often shared creative endeavour; the two had written, collaged and entertained themselves with the combined fragments of Arts history and contemporary culture. This small flat their studio and living space, and where they enacted a loving relationship at a time when homosexuality was forbidden by law ‘in public and in private’. Their arrest and trial would be an abrupt curtailment of this private idyll and a turning point in their lives, setting them separately (though never entirely separated) on a path which would lead John to become Joe Orton, one of the fashionable playwrights of sixties London. Halliwell pursued his own creative path with further collage — but did so without fully finding an audience for his artwork to match Orton’s rapid theatrical success. Their deaths at Noel Road five years later in 1967 became the sensationalised end to what had largely been a private, enclosed life together; Orton murdered by Halliwell who then took his own life. Now, fifty years after the trial, Malicious Damage looks closely at the collaged dust jackets still remaining within the archive at Islington Local History Centre and focuses on the early collaborative nature of Orton and Halliwell’s relationship. Using the changing collage that had consumed such a large part of their lives in Noel Road as its frame, Malicious Damage underlines the visual and performative nature of their collaborations, as well as using the process of collage itself to investigate Halliwell and his work in greater detail. Malicious Damage: The Defaced Library Books of Kenneth Halliwell and Joe Orton. Ilsa Colsell. Donlon Books (2013).
In 1962, a then unknown couple, John (Joe) Orton and Kenneth Halliwell, were tried at Old Street Magistrates Court, London, charged with, ‘larceny, malicious damage and wilful damage’, involving hundreds of Islington Library’s book stock. Over the previous three years the pair had been secretly stealing these books, removing what amounted to thousands of valuable art plates and either using them to create alternative dust jackets for other books, (which were then returned quietly to the library’s shelves for unsuspecting browsers to find), or pasting them directly into a large and uninterrupted collage spanning the interior walls of their one-roomed flat on nearby Noel Road. The pair would receive a six-month custodial sentence for these actions. The reconfigured dust jackets were part of a decade of often shared creative endeavour; the two had written, collaged and entertained themselves with the combined fragments of Arts history and contemporary culture. This small flat their studio and living space, and where they enacted a loving relationship at a time when homosexuality was forbidden by law ‘in public and in private’. Their arrest and trial would be an abrupt curtailment of this private idyll and a turning point in their lives, setting them separately (though never entirely separated) on a path which would lead John to become Joe Orton, one of the fashionable playwrights of sixties London. Halliwell pursued his own creative path with further collage — but did so without fully finding an audience for his artwork to match Orton’s rapid theatrical success. Their deaths at Noel Road five years later in 1967 became the sensationalised end to what had largely been a private, enclosed life together; Orton murdered by Halliwell who then took his own life. Now, fifty years after the trial, Malicious Damage looks closely at the collaged dust jackets still remaining within the archive at Islington Local History Centre and focuses on the early collaborative nature of Orton and Halliwell’s relationship. Using the changing collage that had consumed such a large part of their lives in Noel Road as its frame, Malicious Damage underlines the visual and performative nature of their collaborations, as well as using the process of collage itself to investigate Halliwell and his work in greater detail. Malicious Damage: The Defaced Library Books of Kenneth Halliwell and Joe Orton. Ilsa Colsell. Donlon Books (2013).
In 1962, a then unknown couple, John (Joe) Orton and Kenneth Halliwell, were tried at Old Street Magistrates Court, London, charged with, ‘larceny, malicious damage and wilful damage’, involving hundreds of Islington Library’s book stock. Over the previous three years the pair had been secretly stealing these books, removing what amounted to thousands of valuable art plates and either using them to create alternative dust jackets for other books, (which were then returned quietly to the library’s shelves for unsuspecting browsers to find), or pasting them directly into a large and uninterrupted collage spanning the interior walls of their one-roomed flat on nearby Noel Road. The pair would receive a six-month custodial sentence for these actions. The reconfigured dust jackets were part of a decade of often shared creative endeavour; the two had written, collaged and entertained themselves with the combined fragments of Arts history and contemporary culture. This small flat their studio and living space, and where they enacted a loving relationship at a time when homosexuality was forbidden by law ‘in public and in private’. Their arrest and trial would be an abrupt curtailment of this private idyll and a turning point in their lives, setting them separately (though never entirely separated) on a path which would lead John to become Joe Orton, one of the fashionable playwrights of sixties London. Halliwell pursued his own creative path with further collage — but did so without fully finding an audience for his artwork to match Orton’s rapid theatrical success. Their deaths at Noel Road five years later in 1967 became the sensationalised end to what had largely been a private, enclosed life together; Orton murdered by Halliwell who then took his own life. Now, fifty years after the trial, Malicious Damage looks closely at the collaged dust jackets still remaining within the archive at Islington Local History Centre and focuses on the early collaborative nature of Orton and Halliwell’s relationship. Using the changing collage that had consumed such a large part of their lives in Noel Road as its frame, Malicious Damage underlines the visual and performative nature of their collaborations, as well as using the process of collage itself to investigate Halliwell and his work in greater detail. Malicious Damage: The Defaced Library Books of Kenneth Halliwell and Joe Orton. Ilsa Colsell. Donlon Books (2013).
In 1962, a then unknown couple, John (Joe) Orton and Kenneth Halliwell, were tried at Old Street Magistrates Court, London, charged with, ‘larceny, malicious damage and wilful damage’, involving hundreds of Islington Library’s book stock. Over the previous three years the pair had been secretly stealing these books, removing what amounted to thousands of valuable art plates and either using them to create alternative dust jackets for other books, (which were then returned quietly to the library’s shelves for unsuspecting browsers to find), or pasting them directly into a large and uninterrupted collage spanning the interior walls of their one-roomed flat on nearby Noel Road. The pair would receive a six-month custodial sentence for these actions. The reconfigured dust jackets were part of a decade of often shared creative endeavour; the two had written, collaged and entertained themselves with the combined fragments of Arts history and contemporary culture. This small flat their studio and living space, and where they enacted a loving relationship at a time when homosexuality was forbidden by law ‘in public and in private’. Their arrest and trial would be an abrupt curtailment of this private idyll and a turning point in their lives, setting them separately (though never entirely separated) on a path which would lead John to become Joe Orton, one of the fashionable playwrights of sixties London. Halliwell pursued his own creative path with further collage — but did so without fully finding an audience for his artwork to match Orton’s rapid theatrical success. Their deaths at Noel Road five years later in 1967 became the sensationalised end to what had largely been a private, enclosed life together; Orton murdered by Halliwell who then took his own life. Now, fifty years after the trial, Malicious Damage looks closely at the collaged dust jackets still remaining within the archive at Islington Local History Centre and focuses on the early collaborative nature of Orton and Halliwell’s relationship. Using the changing collage that had consumed such a large part of their lives in Noel Road as its frame, Malicious Damage underlines the visual and performative nature of their collaborations, as well as using the process of collage itself to investigate Halliwell and his work in greater detail. Malicious Damage: The Defaced Library Books of Kenneth Halliwell and Joe Orton. Ilsa Colsell. Donlon Books (2013).
In 1962, a then unknown couple, John (Joe) Orton and Kenneth Halliwell, were tried at Old Street Magistrates Court, London, charged with, ‘larceny, malicious damage and wilful damage’, involving hundreds of Islington Library’s book stock. Over the previous three years the pair had been secretly stealing these books, removing what amounted to thousands of valuable art plates and either using them to create alternative dust jackets for other books, (which were then returned quietly to the library’s shelves for unsuspecting browsers to find), or pasting them directly into a large and uninterrupted collage spanning the interior walls of their one-roomed flat on nearby Noel Road. The pair would receive a six-month custodial sentence for these actions. The reconfigured dust jackets were part of a decade of often shared creative endeavour; the two had written, collaged and entertained themselves with the combined fragments of Arts history and contemporary culture. This small flat their studio and living space, and where they enacted a loving relationship at a time when homosexuality was forbidden by law ‘in public and in private’. Their arrest and trial would be an abrupt curtailment of this private idyll and a turning point in their lives, setting them separately (though never entirely separated) on a path which would lead John to become Joe Orton, one of the fashionable playwrights of sixties London. Halliwell pursued his own creative path with further collage — but did so without fully finding an audience for his artwork to match Orton’s rapid theatrical success. Their deaths at Noel Road five years later in 1967 became the sensationalised end to what had largely been a private, enclosed life together; Orton murdered by Halliwell who then took his own life. Now, fifty years after the trial, Malicious Damage looks closely at the collaged dust jackets still remaining within the archive at Islington Local History Centre and focuses on the early collaborative nature of Orton and Halliwell’s relationship. Using the changing collage that had consumed such a large part of their lives in Noel Road as its frame, Malicious Damage underlines the visual and performative nature of their collaborations, as well as using the process of collage itself to investigate Halliwell and his work in greater detail. Malicious Damage: The Defaced Library Books of Kenneth Halliwell and Joe Orton. Ilsa Colsell. Donlon Books (2013).
In 1962, a then unknown couple, John (Joe) Orton and Kenneth Halliwell, were tried at Old Street Magistrates Court, London, charged with, ‘larceny, malicious damage and wilful damage’, involving hundreds of Islington Library’s book stock. Over the previous three years the pair had been secretly stealing these books, removing what amounted to thousands of valuable art plates and either using them to create alternative dust jackets for other books, (which were then returned quietly to the library’s shelves for unsuspecting browsers to find), or pasting them directly into a large and uninterrupted collage spanning the interior walls of their one-roomed flat on nearby Noel Road. The pair would receive a six-month custodial sentence for these actions. The reconfigured dust jackets were part of a decade of often shared creative endeavour; the two had written, collaged and entertained themselves with the combined fragments of Arts history and contemporary culture. This small flat their studio and living space, and where they enacted a loving relationship at a time when homosexuality was forbidden by law ‘in public and in private’. Their arrest and trial would be an abrupt curtailment of this private idyll and a turning point in their lives, setting them separately (though never entirely separated) on a path which would lead John to become Joe Orton, one of the fashionable playwrights of sixties London. Halliwell pursued his own creative path with further collage — but did so without fully finding an audience for his artwork to match Orton’s rapid theatrical success. Their deaths at Noel Road five years later in 1967 became the sensationalised end to what had largely been a private, enclosed life together; Orton murdered by Halliwell who then took his own life. Now, fifty years after the trial, Malicious Damage looks closely at the collaged dust jackets still remaining within the archive at Islington Local History Centre and focuses on the early collaborative nature of Orton and Halliwell’s relationship. Using the changing collage that had consumed such a large part of their lives in Noel Road as its frame, Malicious Damage underlines the visual and performative nature of their collaborations, as well as using the process of collage itself to investigate Halliwell and his work in greater detail. Malicious Damage: The Defaced Library Books of Kenneth Halliwell and Joe Orton. Ilsa Colsell. Donlon Books (2013).
In 1962, a then unknown couple, John (Joe) Orton and Kenneth Halliwell, were tried at Old Street Magistrates Court, London, charged with, ‘larceny, malicious damage and wilful damage’, involving hundreds of Islington Library’s book stock. Over the previous three years the pair had been secretly stealing these books, removing what amounted to thousands of valuable art plates and either using them to create alternative dust jackets for other books, (which were then returned quietly to the library’s shelves for unsuspecting browsers to find), or pasting them directly into a large and uninterrupted collage spanning the interior walls of their one-roomed flat on nearby Noel Road. The pair would receive a six-month custodial sentence for these actions. The reconfigured dust jackets were part of a decade of often shared creative endeavour; the two had written, collaged and entertained themselves with the combined fragments of Arts history and contemporary culture. This small flat their studio and living space, and where they enacted a loving relationship at a time when homosexuality was forbidden by law ‘in public and in private’. Their arrest and trial would be an abrupt curtailment of this private idyll and a turning point in their lives, setting them separately (though never entirely separated) on a path which would lead John to become Joe Orton, one of the fashionable playwrights of sixties London. Halliwell pursued his own creative path with further collage — but did so without fully finding an audience for his artwork to match Orton’s rapid theatrical success. Their deaths at Noel Road five years later in 1967 became the sensationalised end to what had largely been a private, enclosed life together; Orton murdered by Halliwell who then took his own life. Now, fifty years after the trial, Malicious Damage looks closely at the collaged dust jackets still remaining within the archive at Islington Local History Centre and focuses on the early collaborative nature of Orton and Halliwell’s relationship. Using the changing collage that had consumed such a large part of their lives in Noel Road as its frame, Malicious Damage underlines the visual and performative nature of their collaborations, as well as using the process of collage itself to investigate Halliwell and his work in greater detail. Malicious Damage: The Defaced Library Books of Kenneth Halliwell and Joe Orton. Ilsa Colsell. Donlon Books (2013).
In 1962, a then unknown couple, John (Joe) Orton and Kenneth Halliwell, were tried at Old Street Magistrates Court, London, charged with, ‘larceny, malicious damage and wilful damage’, involving hundreds of Islington Library’s book stock. Over the previous three years the pair had been secretly stealing these books, removing what amounted to thousands of valuable art plates and either using them to create alternative dust jackets for other books, (which were then returned quietly to the library’s shelves for unsuspecting browsers to find), or pasting them directly into a large and uninterrupted collage spanning the interior walls of their one-roomed flat on nearby Noel Road. The pair would receive a six-month custodial sentence for these actions. The reconfigured dust jackets were part of a decade of often shared creative endeavour; the two had written, collaged and entertained themselves with the combined fragments of Arts history and contemporary culture. This small flat their studio and living space, and where they enacted a loving relationship at a time when homosexuality was forbidden by law ‘in public and in private’. Their arrest and trial would be an abrupt curtailment of this private idyll and a turning point in their lives, setting them separately (though never entirely separated) on a path which would lead John to become Joe Orton, one of the fashionable playwrights of sixties London. Halliwell pursued his own creative path with further collage — but did so without fully finding an audience for his artwork to match Orton’s rapid theatrical success. Their deaths at Noel Road five years later in 1967 became the sensationalised end to what had largely been a private, enclosed life together; Orton murdered by Halliwell who then took his own life. Now, fifty years after the trial, Malicious Damage looks closely at the collaged dust jackets still remaining within the archive at Islington Local History Centre and focuses on the early collaborative nature of Orton and Halliwell’s relationship. Using the changing collage that had consumed such a large part of their lives in Noel Road as its frame, Malicious Damage underlines the visual and performative nature of their collaborations, as well as using the process of collage itself to investigate Halliwell and his work in greater detail.

Malicious Damage: The Defaced Library Books of Kenneth Halliwell and Joe Orton. Ilsa Colsell. Donlon Books (2013).

In 1962, a then unknown couple, John (Joe) Orton and Kenneth Halliwell, were tried at Old Street Magistrates Court, London, charged with, ‘larceny, malicious damage and wilful damage’, involving hundreds of Islington Library’s book stock. Over the previous three years the pair had been secretly stealing these books, removing what amounted to thousands of valuable art plates and either using them to create alternative dust jackets for other books, (which were then returned quietly to the library’s shelves for unsuspecting browsers to find), or pasting them directly into a large and uninterrupted collage spanning the interior walls of their one-roomed flat on nearby Noel Road. The pair would receive a six-month custodial sentence for these actions. The reconfigured dust jackets were part of a decade of often shared creative endeavour; the two had written, collaged and entertained themselves with the combined fragments of Arts history and contemporary culture. This small flat their studio and living space, and where they enacted a loving relationship at a time when homosexuality was forbidden by law ‘in public and in private’. Their arrest and trial would be an abrupt curtailment of this private idyll and a turning point in their lives, setting them separately (though never entirely separated) on a path which would lead John to become Joe Orton, one of the fashionable playwrights of sixties London. Halliwell pursued his own creative path with further collage — but did so without fully finding an audience for his artwork to match Orton’s rapid theatrical success. Their deaths at Noel Road five years later in 1967 became the sensationalised end to what had largely been a private, enclosed life together; Orton murdered by Halliwell who then took his own life. Now, fifty years after the trial, Malicious Damage looks closely at the collaged dust jackets still remaining within the archive at Islington Local History Centre and focuses on the early collaborative nature of Orton and Halliwell’s relationship. Using the changing collage that had consumed such a large part of their lives in Noel Road as its frame, Malicious Damage underlines the visual and performative nature of their collaborations, as well as using the process of collage itself to investigate Halliwell and his work in greater detail.

Perversions of Paper workshop at Keynes Library, Birkbeck College, London; convened by the Birkbeck Material Texts Network and the Archive Futures Research Network.
Photos of / works by: Tara Bergin, Egidija Ciricaite, Michael Hampton with Gill Partington, Christina Mitrentse, Emily Orley, Linda Toigo, Altea Grau Vidal. Perversions of Paper workshop at Keynes Library, Birkbeck College, London; convened by the Birkbeck Material Texts Network and the Archive Futures Research Network.
Photos of / works by: Tara Bergin, Egidija Ciricaite, Michael Hampton with Gill Partington, Christina Mitrentse, Emily Orley, Linda Toigo, Altea Grau Vidal. Perversions of Paper workshop at Keynes Library, Birkbeck College, London; convened by the Birkbeck Material Texts Network and the Archive Futures Research Network.
Photos of / works by: Tara Bergin, Egidija Ciricaite, Michael Hampton with Gill Partington, Christina Mitrentse, Emily Orley, Linda Toigo, Altea Grau Vidal. Perversions of Paper workshop at Keynes Library, Birkbeck College, London; convened by the Birkbeck Material Texts Network and the Archive Futures Research Network.
Photos of / works by: Tara Bergin, Egidija Ciricaite, Michael Hampton with Gill Partington, Christina Mitrentse, Emily Orley, Linda Toigo, Altea Grau Vidal. Perversions of Paper workshop at Keynes Library, Birkbeck College, London; convened by the Birkbeck Material Texts Network and the Archive Futures Research Network.
Photos of / works by: Tara Bergin, Egidija Ciricaite, Michael Hampton with Gill Partington, Christina Mitrentse, Emily Orley, Linda Toigo, Altea Grau Vidal. Perversions of Paper workshop at Keynes Library, Birkbeck College, London; convened by the Birkbeck Material Texts Network and the Archive Futures Research Network.
Photos of / works by: Tara Bergin, Egidija Ciricaite, Michael Hampton with Gill Partington, Christina Mitrentse, Emily Orley, Linda Toigo, Altea Grau Vidal. Perversions of Paper workshop at Keynes Library, Birkbeck College, London; convened by the Birkbeck Material Texts Network and the Archive Futures Research Network.
Photos of / works by: Tara Bergin, Egidija Ciricaite, Michael Hampton with Gill Partington, Christina Mitrentse, Emily Orley, Linda Toigo, Altea Grau Vidal. Perversions of Paper workshop at Keynes Library, Birkbeck College, London; convened by the Birkbeck Material Texts Network and the Archive Futures Research Network.
Photos of / works by: Tara Bergin, Egidija Ciricaite, Michael Hampton with Gill Partington, Christina Mitrentse, Emily Orley, Linda Toigo, Altea Grau Vidal. Perversions of Paper workshop at Keynes Library, Birkbeck College, London; convened by the Birkbeck Material Texts Network and the Archive Futures Research Network.
Photos of / works by: Tara Bergin, Egidija Ciricaite, Michael Hampton with Gill Partington, Christina Mitrentse, Emily Orley, Linda Toigo, Altea Grau Vidal. Perversions of Paper workshop at Keynes Library, Birkbeck College, London; convened by the Birkbeck Material Texts Network and the Archive Futures Research Network.
Photos of / works by: Tara Bergin, Egidija Ciricaite, Michael Hampton with Gill Partington, Christina Mitrentse, Emily Orley, Linda Toigo, Altea Grau Vidal.

Perversions of Paper workshop at Keynes Library, Birkbeck College, London; convened by the Birkbeck Material Texts Network and the Archive Futures Research Network.

Photos of / works by: Tara Bergin, Egidija Ciricaite, Michael Hampton with Gill PartingtonChristina MitrentseEmily OrleyLinda Toigo, Altea Grau Vidal.

Cuaderno de Composicion. Martin Gubbins. Libros Del Pez Espiral. (April 2014) Cuaderno de Composicion. Martin Gubbins. Libros Del Pez Espiral. (April 2014) Cuaderno de Composicion. Martin Gubbins. Libros Del Pez Espiral. (April 2014) Cuaderno de Composicion. Martin Gubbins. Libros Del Pez Espiral. (April 2014) Cuaderno de Composicion. Martin Gubbins. Libros Del Pez Espiral. (April 2014) Cuaderno de Composicion. Martin Gubbins. Libros Del Pez Espiral. (April 2014) Cuaderno de Composicion. Martin Gubbins. Libros Del Pez Espiral. (April 2014) Cuaderno de Composicion. Martin Gubbins. Libros Del Pez Espiral. (April 2014) Cuaderno de Composicion. Martin Gubbins. Libros Del Pez Espiral. (April 2014)

Cuaderno de Composicion. Martin Gubbins. Libros Del Pez Espiral. (April 2014)

Collective Task members Rob Fitterman,Carol Mirakove, Kim Rosenfield, Josef Kaplan, Klaus Killisch, Kristin Lucas, Lanny Jordan Jackson, Monica de la Torre, Sabine Herrmann, Yedda Morrison, and special guest Halyna Kruk gave a reading at the Akademie der Künste in Berlin, June 2014.

Collective Task is an art project founded in 2006 in New York. Its appeal is thanks to a simple basic premise: a group of artists set each other reciprocal tasks. Every month one of the participants invites the other members to respond to their proposal within the next month. 

dOCUMENTA (13): 100 Notizen - 100 Gedanken: Alejandro Jodorowsky. Hatje Cantz (2011). 
The Chilean director, cartoonist, composer, and visual artist Alejandro Jodorowsky (*1929) dedicated a voluminous notebook to the script for his film Dune, after the 1965 science-fiction novel of the same name by Frank Herbert. He even printed the title on this book. But his ambitious project remained unrealized, and in the end, the 1974 notebook instead brings together his intensive research about the historical Tarot de Marseille. For three years, Jodorowsky followed the paths of the famous tarot deck to explore its origins and its historical development, as well as the various teachings and interpretations embedded within it. The notebook contains the result of his encounters, conversations, and studies in the form of texts, collages, and diagrams, which are reproduced here in a selection.
With an introduction by Chus Martínez.
German, English / 2011. 48 pp., facsimile / 17.90 x 25.10 cm / softcover / ISBN 978-3-7757-2863-8 dOCUMENTA (13): 100 Notizen - 100 Gedanken: Alejandro Jodorowsky. Hatje Cantz (2011). 
The Chilean director, cartoonist, composer, and visual artist Alejandro Jodorowsky (*1929) dedicated a voluminous notebook to the script for his film Dune, after the 1965 science-fiction novel of the same name by Frank Herbert. He even printed the title on this book. But his ambitious project remained unrealized, and in the end, the 1974 notebook instead brings together his intensive research about the historical Tarot de Marseille. For three years, Jodorowsky followed the paths of the famous tarot deck to explore its origins and its historical development, as well as the various teachings and interpretations embedded within it. The notebook contains the result of his encounters, conversations, and studies in the form of texts, collages, and diagrams, which are reproduced here in a selection.
With an introduction by Chus Martínez.
German, English / 2011. 48 pp., facsimile / 17.90 x 25.10 cm / softcover / ISBN 978-3-7757-2863-8 dOCUMENTA (13): 100 Notizen - 100 Gedanken: Alejandro Jodorowsky. Hatje Cantz (2011). 
The Chilean director, cartoonist, composer, and visual artist Alejandro Jodorowsky (*1929) dedicated a voluminous notebook to the script for his film Dune, after the 1965 science-fiction novel of the same name by Frank Herbert. He even printed the title on this book. But his ambitious project remained unrealized, and in the end, the 1974 notebook instead brings together his intensive research about the historical Tarot de Marseille. For three years, Jodorowsky followed the paths of the famous tarot deck to explore its origins and its historical development, as well as the various teachings and interpretations embedded within it. The notebook contains the result of his encounters, conversations, and studies in the form of texts, collages, and diagrams, which are reproduced here in a selection.
With an introduction by Chus Martínez.
German, English / 2011. 48 pp., facsimile / 17.90 x 25.10 cm / softcover / ISBN 978-3-7757-2863-8 dOCUMENTA (13): 100 Notizen - 100 Gedanken: Alejandro Jodorowsky. Hatje Cantz (2011). 
The Chilean director, cartoonist, composer, and visual artist Alejandro Jodorowsky (*1929) dedicated a voluminous notebook to the script for his film Dune, after the 1965 science-fiction novel of the same name by Frank Herbert. He even printed the title on this book. But his ambitious project remained unrealized, and in the end, the 1974 notebook instead brings together his intensive research about the historical Tarot de Marseille. For three years, Jodorowsky followed the paths of the famous tarot deck to explore its origins and its historical development, as well as the various teachings and interpretations embedded within it. The notebook contains the result of his encounters, conversations, and studies in the form of texts, collages, and diagrams, which are reproduced here in a selection.
With an introduction by Chus Martínez.
German, English / 2011. 48 pp., facsimile / 17.90 x 25.10 cm / softcover / ISBN 978-3-7757-2863-8 dOCUMENTA (13): 100 Notizen - 100 Gedanken: Alejandro Jodorowsky. Hatje Cantz (2011). 
The Chilean director, cartoonist, composer, and visual artist Alejandro Jodorowsky (*1929) dedicated a voluminous notebook to the script for his film Dune, after the 1965 science-fiction novel of the same name by Frank Herbert. He even printed the title on this book. But his ambitious project remained unrealized, and in the end, the 1974 notebook instead brings together his intensive research about the historical Tarot de Marseille. For three years, Jodorowsky followed the paths of the famous tarot deck to explore its origins and its historical development, as well as the various teachings and interpretations embedded within it. The notebook contains the result of his encounters, conversations, and studies in the form of texts, collages, and diagrams, which are reproduced here in a selection.
With an introduction by Chus Martínez.
German, English / 2011. 48 pp., facsimile / 17.90 x 25.10 cm / softcover / ISBN 978-3-7757-2863-8 dOCUMENTA (13): 100 Notizen - 100 Gedanken: Alejandro Jodorowsky. Hatje Cantz (2011). 
The Chilean director, cartoonist, composer, and visual artist Alejandro Jodorowsky (*1929) dedicated a voluminous notebook to the script for his film Dune, after the 1965 science-fiction novel of the same name by Frank Herbert. He even printed the title on this book. But his ambitious project remained unrealized, and in the end, the 1974 notebook instead brings together his intensive research about the historical Tarot de Marseille. For three years, Jodorowsky followed the paths of the famous tarot deck to explore its origins and its historical development, as well as the various teachings and interpretations embedded within it. The notebook contains the result of his encounters, conversations, and studies in the form of texts, collages, and diagrams, which are reproduced here in a selection.
With an introduction by Chus Martínez.
German, English / 2011. 48 pp., facsimile / 17.90 x 25.10 cm / softcover / ISBN 978-3-7757-2863-8 dOCUMENTA (13): 100 Notizen - 100 Gedanken: Alejandro Jodorowsky. Hatje Cantz (2011). 
The Chilean director, cartoonist, composer, and visual artist Alejandro Jodorowsky (*1929) dedicated a voluminous notebook to the script for his film Dune, after the 1965 science-fiction novel of the same name by Frank Herbert. He even printed the title on this book. But his ambitious project remained unrealized, and in the end, the 1974 notebook instead brings together his intensive research about the historical Tarot de Marseille. For three years, Jodorowsky followed the paths of the famous tarot deck to explore its origins and its historical development, as well as the various teachings and interpretations embedded within it. The notebook contains the result of his encounters, conversations, and studies in the form of texts, collages, and diagrams, which are reproduced here in a selection.
With an introduction by Chus Martínez.
German, English / 2011. 48 pp., facsimile / 17.90 x 25.10 cm / softcover / ISBN 978-3-7757-2863-8

dOCUMENTA (13): 100 Notizen - 100 Gedanken: Alejandro Jodorowsky. Hatje Cantz (2011). 

The Chilean director, cartoonist, composer, and visual artist Alejandro Jodorowsky (*1929) dedicated a voluminous notebook to the script for his film Dune, after the 1965 science-fiction novel of the same name by Frank Herbert. He even printed the title on this book. But his ambitious project remained unrealized, and in the end, the 1974 notebook instead brings together his intensive research about the historical Tarot de Marseille. For three years, Jodorowsky followed the paths of the famous tarot deck to explore its origins and its historical development, as well as the various teachings and interpretations embedded within it. The notebook contains the result of his encounters, conversations, and studies in the form of texts, collages, and diagrams, which are reproduced here in a selection.

With an introduction by Chus Martínez.

German, English / 2011. 48 pp., facsimile / 17.90 x 25.10 cm / softcover / ISBN 978-3-7757-2863-8